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What Are the Top 10 Brightest Galaxies in the Universe?

When we look at the sky in a clear night we can see countless starts and planets just glittering throughout and around our little earth. We always want to single out that one brightest star but have you ever thought about the brightest galaxies in the universe. You may not be able to locate these great and massive parts of our endless universe, but astronomers with their sophisticated equipment and proven mathematical tools can tell us which of the galaxies are shining the brightest.

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1. Large Magellanic cloud

It is the shiniest among the top ten brightest galaxies in universe as seen from the earth. Large Magellanic cloud, not so surprisingly is also the closest one to planet earth. At a distance of 170,000 light years away from the earth, Large Magellanic is only a satellite galaxy of our own Milky Way at size of about one tenth of the our galaxy.

2. Small Magellanic Cloud

Scientist call Small Magellanic Cloud a dwarf galaxy with about several million stars compared to Milky Way’s 200-300 billion stars. Small magellanic Cloud (SMC) has diameter of only 7,000 light years and holds several hundred million stars. Small Magellanic galaxy is 210,000 light years away and has the most distant planets or stars that can be seen with the naked eye.

3. Andromeda Galaxy 2.6 4.36

At approximately 2.6 million light years away, the spiral galaxy of Andromeda is found within the constellation of Andromeda. The great Andromeda Nebula is the largest spiral galaxy to our own milky way. The name is derived from princess Andromeda having Greek mythological sources. This bright galaxy is estimated to be 1.2 times the size of the Milky Way.

4. Triangulum Galaxy

Triangulum Galazy, like Andromeda, is a spiral galaxy which lives at approximately 2.8 million light years from the earth. Triangulum Galaxy with a diameter of 50,000 light years stands as the fourth brightest galaxy observed from the earth.

5. Centaurus Galaxy

Centaurus is around 11 to 12 million light years away from us. As the fifth brightest galaxy, Centaururs is only visible from low northern latitudes and the southern hemisphere. This galaxy is believed to have x-ray and radio wavelength emissions from its core, which scientist say are being emitted from its jet emiited particles which are astonishingly moving at about one half of the speed of light.

6. Bode’s Galaxy

Bode’s Galaxy also known as Messier 81 is a spiral galaxy like that of Triangulum and Andromeda. The sixth of the top ten brightest galaxies is also around 12 million light years away from the earth. This galaxy was discovered by Johann Elert Bode in 1774 and is thought to have a massive black hole and low apparent magnitude, which translates directly to more brightness; a popular point of observation for armature astronomers.

7. Silver Coin Galaxy

Labelled as an intermediate spiral galaxy, Silver Coin Galaxy standing from a distance of around 8.5 million light years forms the one of the brightest galaxy seen from the earth. This galaxy is also fitted in the group of Sturbust galaxy meaning that it is currently going through a period of intense star formation.

8. Southern Pinwheel Galaxy

Southern Pinwheel Galaxy, also known as Messier 83 is another intermediate spiral galaxy after Silver Coin, which is approximately 15 million light years away from our tiny planet.

9. Pinwheel Galaxy

After Southern Pinwheel Galaxy comes Pinwheel Galaxy herself. Unlike the number 8, Pinwheel is a spiral galaxy and nearly 23 million light years away and is contained within the Ursa Major constellation. As one of the top brightest galaxy, Pinwheel is relatively larger than our Milky way; it consists of a 170,000 light year diameter.

10. Cigar Galaxy

Number 10 brightest galaxy in our top ten list is Cigar Galaxy or Messier 82. It is nearly 4.9 million light years away but is thought be as much as five times brighter than the Milky Way. Cigar Galaxy is producing young starts at a rate of 10 times faster than the centre of our own Milky Way.

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